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Men urged to get checked for diabetes

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This week (11th-17th June 2018) men across Cheshire are being urged to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes.

This year Diabetes Prevention Week and Men’s Health Week both take place at the same time.

One in 10 men nationally now has diabetes and the disease is expected to increase sharply in middle-aged men over the next 20 years.

NHS South Cheshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and NHS Vale Royal CCG are backing the two awareness campaigns to help increase the number of men being checked and referred to the National Diabetes Prevention Programme where required.


Men are being encouraged not to ignore these seven symptoms:

  • feeling very thirsty
  • urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night
  • feeling very tired
  • weight loss and loss of muscle bulk
  • itching around the penis, or frequent episodes of thrush
  • cuts or wounds that heal slowly
  • blurred vision

Across South Cheshire and Vale Royal, the number of both men and women being referred to the ‘Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme’ has risen dramatically – from 158 in 2016/17 to 1,147 in 2017/18.

The programme is a free support service for people at risk of type 2 diabetes, providing personalised advice on healthy eating, being more active and losing weight.

Dr Sinead Clarke, GP and clinical director at the CCGs, said: “As part of Men’s Health Week, I would urge men to check out the NHS Choices website which will give them a whole host of information about their health.

“It’s very important for diabetes, in both men and women, to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated.

“Seeing such a massive increase in the number of people being referred to The Healthier You: NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme is such a good sign, people across South Cheshire and Vale Royal really taking responsibility for their health.”

To find out more about diabetes, visit the NHS Choices website: www.nhs.uk/conditions/diabetes

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